<b>Wersja Polska</b>
WERSJA POLSKA

General Heinz Guderian with NKVD Colonel Semyon Moiseyevich Krivoshein (right), the responsible for the Polish final solution on the territory of Poland occupied by  soviets.
NKVD Colonel Krivoshein salutes submissively his comrade at arms and war crimes - Nazi General Heinz Guderian - at the military parade crowning the Nazi-Soviet slaughter of Poland.

General Heinz Guderian with NKVD Colonel Semyon Moiseyevich Krivoshein (right), a responsible for the final solution against Poles in Poland occupied by the soviets. Col. Krivoshein salutes submissively his comrade at arms and war crimes - Nazi General Guderian - at the military parade crowning the Nazi-Soviet slaughter of Poland.

Lazar Moiseyevich KAGANOVICH, a soviet criminal of jewish origin.

Lazar Moiseyevich KAGANOVICH, jewish co-leader of Soviet Union responsible for the crime of genocide, the crimes against peace, the war crimes, and the crimes against humanity.

Vyacheslav MOLOTOV

Vyacheslav MOLOTOV, responsible for the crime of genocide, the crimes against peace, the war crimes, and the crimes against humanity.

Lawrientij Pawlowicz Beria (a jew), the head of NKVD

Lawrientij Pawlowicz Beria, the head of NKVD, responsible for the crime of genocide, the crimes against peace, the war crimes, and the crimes against humanity.

Kombrig NKVD Ivan Serov

Kombrig NKVD Ivan Serov, the responsible for making selections who will be executed in soviet camps for Polish POW.

Piotr Karpowicz SOPRUNIENKO. As a head of the Directorate of Prisoner-of-War Affairs NKVD USSR, he organized, planed signing daily 'execution lists' and supervised executions of 25 700 Polish POWs between March and April 1940.

Piotr Karpowicz Soprunienko. As a head of the Directorate of Prisoner-of-War Affairs NKVD USSR, he signed daily "execution lists" and supervised executions of 25 700 Polish POWs between March and April 1940.

Exhuming bodies of Polish POWs killed by soviets in Katyn Woods, Russia

Germans exhuming bodies of Polish POWs executed by soviets in Katyn Woods, Russia.

Aerial photo of execution site in Katyn Woods, Russia.

Aerial photo of execution site in Katyn Woods, Russia.

One of the open mass graves in Katyn Woods, Russia.

One of the open mass graves in Katyn Woods, Russia.

NKVD prison yard filled with cadavers of Polish prisoners killed by soviets before retreating from Lwów. July 1, 1941

NKVD prison yard filled with cadavers of Polish prisoners killed by soviets before retreating from Lwów. July 1, 1941. German invasion surprised the NKVD, whose jails and prisons were crowded with political prisoners. Rather that release their prisoners as they hastened to retreat during the first week of the invasion, the Soviet secret police had simply slaughtered them. When the families of the arrested rushed to the prisons after the Soviet evacuation, they were aghast to find bodies so badly mutilated that many could not be identified.

The Magdeburg Sting 1939-40

Soviets Execute Polish POWs and Prisoners


On 1 September, 1939 German Army invaded Poland from the west, then on 17 September, 1939 Red Army invaded Poland from the east, a stab in the back, occupying 52% of Polish territory. As the German Army front units were closely followed by special SS Einsatzgruppen units charged to massacre the prominent and influential Polish citizens, so the Red Army units were followed by NKVD units charged to execute Polish leadership and to deport into labor camps the remaining Polish citizens living in occupied territories. A jew, NKVD colonel Semyon Moiseyevich Krivoshein, was appointed by NKVD general Ivan Serov to lead the elimination of Polish opposition to soviet authority in occupied territory.

Marshal Rydz-Śmigły of Polish Army's High Command ordered all units not to fight the invading Soviets. They were, despite occasional fierce resistance, virtually unopposed, and could focus almost entirely on robbing and murdering at will. Also, never before having an opportunity to see the civilized World, they could now take full advantage of its "decadence". And so they did - it was not that uncommon to see the Soviets wearing several wrist watches at the same time, enjoying a drink from a bidet, or washing themselves in a toilet bowl.

In few days, 250,000 Polish soldiers, including 10 to 18 thousands of officers, are taken prisoners. They are force marched, under soviet NKVD cavalry guard, into the soviet interior.

In the six weeks of the Polish Campaign of 1939, Poland lost close to 200,000 of her citizens, killed or murdered by the Nazi-Soviet aggressors - military personnel, paramilitary, government administrators and civilians. Although there are known, sporadic cases of Polish POWs being murdered by the Nazis (Dabrowa near Ciepielow, Zwierzyniec), the Soviets were notorious. They murdered thousands during the first three weeks of the Soviet invasion of Poland. Augustów... Augustowka... Bijary... Brzostowice... Chodorów... Dąbrowica... Gaje... Grabowiec... Grodno... Komarów... Kosów Poleski... Lwów... Mokrany... Mołodeczno... Oszmiana... Rohatyń... Sarny... Szack... Świsłocz... Wołkowysk... Złoczów... and hundreds other places, still unknown... Makeshift cemeteries became an overwhelmingly common feature of Poland's landscape under Soviet occupation.

Soviet occupation created for anti-Polish elements within ethnic minorities an excellent opportunity to settle their imaginary grievances against Poland and Poles. Units of Workers Guards in Polish towns and Peasants Guards in the country were formed - mostly from eager jewish collaborators. They provided the NKVD with information on Polish resistance, denounced members of the Polish military, police and other "enemies" in hiding, and were instrumental in preparation of proscription and deportation lists. The Poles, in general, kept a united front against the Soviet regime. Some, however - communists and opportunists - joined the ranks of renegades and volunteered to the Guards.

The four major deportations of Polish citizens from the Soviet occupation zone took place on February 10, April 13 and June in 1940, and from mid-June 1941 until the invasion of the Soviet Union by Germany. How many people were deported? No one really knows, and chances are that no one will ever know the full scale of that Soviet ethnic cleansing campaign.
The most conservative Polish count, based on Soviet documents, is as follows: 140,000 during the first, 60,000 during the second, 80,000 during the third and 40,000 Polish citizens, mainly from the Vilnius area, during the fourth deportation for a grand total of 320,000 persons. These Soviet figures, even if accurate (and some scholars question their veracity), do not give a complete picture of that horrendous Soviet ethnic cleansing campaign aimed against Polish citizens. If to add to them the various other deportations, smaller in scale, resulting in the displacement of civilians, prisoners of war, and people arrested for political reasons and detained in the prisons of Eastern Poland, about half of whom were eventually deported to Soviet forced-labor camps, one will arrive at 400,000 to 500,000 as the grand total of those deported using the Soviet documents as our point of departure.

By including voluntary workers, those who fled in June/July 1941, Red Army draftees, and other such categories one arrives at approximately 750,000 to 780,000 as the total number of Polish citizens who found themselves in the Soviet Union during the Soviet occupation of Eastern Poland. Earlier estimates of well-known historians provide figures ranging from 1.2 to 1.7 million (including 385,000 children).

Lawrientij Pawlowicz Beria, the head of NKVD, recommends to All-Union Communist Party (bolsheviks) CENTRAL COMMITTEE to execute 25,700 Polish considered as "incorrigible enemies of the soviet authority". These included: Polish Army officers, government officials, policemen, intelligence agents, military policemen, jail guards, members of various counter-revolutionary spy and sabotage organizations, former landowners, factory owners, settlers and fugitives from German occupied zone.

March, 5 1940

Central Committee (politburo) of Soviet Union composed of:


Josef STALIN (married to a jewesse: the sister of Kaganowich)
Lazar Mojsiejewicz KAGANOVICH (a jew)
Mikhail KALININ (a jew)
Anastas MIKOYAN
Vyacheslav MOLOTOV (married to a jewesse)
Kliment VOROSHILOV (married to a jewesse)

unanimously approves the recommendation and issues
The order No. P13/144
Com. Beria
March 5, 1940

Excerpt from the minutes No. 13 of the Politburo of the Central Committee meeting

Resolution 144 - March 5, 1940 regarding the matter submitted by the NKVD USSR

I. Order NKVD, Soviet Union:
1) Cases which are in camps for prisoners of war 14 700 people, former Polish officers, government officials, landowners, policemen, intelligence agents, gendarmes, settlers and prison guards,
2) as well as cases arrested and held in prison in the western regions of Ukraine and Belarus, 11,000 people, members of various kr [counter-revolutionary] espionage and sabotage organizations, former landowners, factory owners, former Polish officers, government officials and fugitives.
- To examine in a special mode, using against them the highest punishment - execution.

II. To consider the matter without calling arrested, without the presentation of accusations, the decision to terminate the investigation and prosecution - in the following procedure:
a) to persons in the camps for prisoners of war - according to information provided by the Board of Prisoners of War Affairs NKVD USSR,
(On the marge hand-written note: "S.T. Case NKVD USSR")
b) to persons in custody - according to the information from the cases delegated by NKVD USSR and NKVD BSSR.

III. Consideration of issues and adopting a resolution in charge of three consisting of t.t. (deleted manually Kabulov) Merkulov, [added in manuscript] Kabulov and Bashtakov (Head of the 1st Division Spec-Soviet NKVD).


People's Commissar
INTERNAL AFFAIRS
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
(Signature: Beria)

Piotr Karpowicz SOPRUNIENKO, the head of the Directorate of Prisoner-of-War Affairs NKVD USSR, was in charge of the organization of executions.

April 5, 1940. Executions commenced when the first 343 Polish POW from the Ostashkov concentration camp were murdered in Kalinin (now Tver). From that day, until May 14, 1940, 6311 Polish POW and policemen were systematically murdered by the shot in the neck in the basement of NKVD prison in Kalinin (now Tver) on 6th Soviet St. The executions, were personally led by the NKVD chief executioners, Vasili Blokhin, Mikhail Kriwienko and Nikolai Siniegubow. NKVD officials who carried out the executions, were given alcohol and awarded cash prizes. The corpses were then taken away in trucks and thrown into the mass graves near the town Mednoye approximately 32 km from the city. Read the description of these events by Dmitrij Tokariew; then the head of NKVD in Kalinin. (1)

In Katin woods, 4421 Polish POWs were shot by drunken NKVD guards. Senior officers, after a verification of identity, were shot in the specially constructed basement of guard's villa. Others had the coat thrown over their head, secured by a running loop, which was tightly tied to the hands in the back. To add to the suffering, a handful of sawdust was thrown inside to obstruct breath, if the victim was struggling. Two NKVD guards were holding the victim, while the third was shooting him/her in the back of the head; clean, efficient work.
Next...

In NKVD detention center in Kharkov, 3820 more Polish POW and imprisoned officials were shot, the bodies loaded on trucks and carried away to the pits in woods nearby, so the "happy workers and farmers" were not demoralized by the event. Later, the pits were opened, the rests, churned up to confuse any possible identification, then reburied.

May 1940
The NKVD detachment took a convoy of sea going barges with proximately 6500 Polish prisoners of war. They were to be escorted to work in coal mines on one of the snow covered Arctic islands. At sea, the barges were sunk, a more efficient method than shooting.

The execution locations of the remaining 4800 Polish prisoners are, up to now, unknown.

October 26, 1940
Beria issued order No. 01 365 to pay every executioner a premium "for the accomplishing successfully special tasks" an extra monthly salary of 800 rubles.

June 22, 1941
The outbreak of hostilities between the Nazis and Soviets was followed by the Soviets' panicky retreat during which the NKVD was unable to "evacuate" Polish citizens from overcrowded prisons in the Soviet occupation zone. After dislodging the Soviets, the Nazis allowed free access to the prisons, where many hoped to find members of their families and friends. And they found - bloodied corpses filling prison yards, corridors, cells and torture chambers... dumped in a sea of blood.


Augustów
Berezwęcz
Białystok
Borysław
Bobrka
Brzezany
Busk
Bystrzyca Nadworniańska
Ciechanowiec
Czortków
Dobromil
Drohobycz
Dubno
Grodno
Grodek Jagielloński
Horodenka
Jaworów
Kałusz


Kamionka Strumiłowa
Kołomyja
Komarno
Krzemieniec
Lwów
Łopatyn
Łuck
Mikołajów
Nadworna
Oleszyce
Oszmiana
Ottynia
Pasieczna
Pińsk
Przemyślany
Równe
Rudki
Sambor


Sarny
Sadowa Wisznia
Słonim
Stanisławów
Stryj
Szczerzec
Tarnopol
Wilejka
Wilno
Włodzimierz Wołynski
Wołkowysk
Wołożyn
Zalesiany
Zaleszczyki
Złoczów
Żołkiew
Żydaczów

Prison after prison, within few days, the soviets murdered in cold blood over ten thousand of innocent people.

More than ten thousand, when including prisoners-of-war, which were also murdered in "evacuation" convoys.

It was not until the spring of 1943 that one of the victims' mass-burial sites - Katyn, was unearthed by German Army. Polish, British, and Red Cross representatives were present during exhumation. Some others - Kharkov and Mednoye became known more than half a century later. Some are still unknown. The atrocity became known under a collective, symbolic name - KATYN MASSACRE.

For details see US Congress Public Hearings on Katyn Massacre.

In 1995, Russia's Chief Military Prosecutor's Office began an official investigation into the Katyn killings. Things looked hopeful indeed.
The Russian criminal case was closed in September 2004. On March 11, 2005, Chief Military Prosecutor Aleksandr Savenkov announced that after reviewing numerous documents, questioning over 900 witnesses, and conducting eighteen examinations, including exhumations, the investigators found no evidence of genocide. Moreover, those perpetrators, who are still alive, would not be prosecuted because of the statute of limitation. The case generated 183 volumes, 116 of which were said to contain state secrets. And that was that; a sinister farce. Perhaps Russia's handling of the Katyn killings provides the world with a definitive answer to the question whether there is any difference, after all, between the Russian and the Soviet mentality and conscience.

The Russian commission no doubt drew its conclusion - that it was not genocide - on the basis that the prisoners were not killed because they were Poles, but rather because of their social status, because they were the enemies of the Soviet Union, as Beria's document plainly states. But the same could be said of Hitler's intention to exterminate the - he did it not because they were jews, but because most were communist or communist sympathizers; the enemies of Germany and indeed of the whole world.

THE LIST OF VICTIMS OF KATYN MASSACRE

The incomplete list of NKVD executioners


ALEKSANDROW A. S.,
ANTONOW Iwan Iljicz,
BABAJAN T. Ch.,
BARANOW M. A.,
BARANOW P. M.,
BARINOW Iwan S.,
BIELOGORLOW W. A.,
BIELOW I. I.,
BIEZRUKOW Iwan Dmitryjewicz,
BLANK K. Je.,
BLOCHIN Wasylij Michajlowicz,
BOGDANOW N. F.,
BOGDANOW P. A.,
BURDA Tymofiej Dmitryjewicz,
CUKANOW A. I.,
CYKULIN M. W.,
CZEKULAJEW W. K.,
CZUZAJKIN I. M.,
DAWYDOW M. Je.,
DIEWIATILOW A. G.,
DMITRYJEW Aleksandr Dmitryjewicz,
DOROGININ F. M.,
DORONIN F. I.,
FADIEJEW A. M.,
FIEDORYSZKO S. M.,
FIELDMAN Iwan Iwanowicz,
FROLENKOW I. L.,
GAWRYLENKOW T. K.,
GIECELEWICZ R. S.,
GOLICYN Nikolaj A.,
GOLOWINKIN N. I.,
GORJACZEW M. D.,
GRIBOW Josif Iwanowicz,
GRYGORJEW Michajl Porfirjewicz,
GUMOTUDINOW I. A.,
GWOZDOWSKI Nikolaj Afanasjewicz,
IGNATJEW M. F.,
ILJIN F. K.,
IWANOW I. M.,
IWANOW W. G.,
JAKOWLEW A. M.,
JAKOWLEW P. A.,
JAKUSZEW T. P.,
JEGOROW A. W.,
JEMIELJANOW A. M.,
KACZYN Tymofiej Fiodorowicz,
KALININ Anatolij Maksymowicz,
KARAWAJEW W. M.,
KARCEW Piotr M.,
KARMANOW A. A.,
KARPOW G. F.,
KISIELOW N. A.,
KOMAROWSKI I. I.,
KOSTIUCZENKO N. K.,
KOSTIUCZENKO W. K.,
KOWALEW A. S.,
KOZOCHOCKI M. A.,
KRASNOWIDOW I. I.,
KRYWIENKO Michajl Spirydonowicz,
KUPRIJ Tymofiej Fiodorowicz,
KUZNIECOW S. S.,
LEBIEDJEW M. D.,


LEWANCZUKOW G. K.,
LAZARIENKOW S. M.,
LOGINOW N. W.,
LUGININ M. I.,
MAKARENKOW G. I.,
MARUSJEW A. Je.,
MIEDWIEDJEW I. B.,
MIELNIK A. T.,
MIELNIK Nikita Wasyliewicz,
MISZCZENKOW N. A.,
MOISIEJENKOW A. A.,
MOISIEJENKOW W. P.,
MOKRIDIN I. P.,
NOWOSIOLOW I. I.,
OFICEROW A. N.,
OKUNIEW A. W.,
ORLOW D. I.,
OSIPOW Wladymir A.,
PAWLOW Wasylij Pawlowicz,
PRUDNIKOW P. G.,
RAZORIENOW A. I.,
RUBANOW Andriej Maksymowicz,
RYBAKOW Aleksiej Aleksandrowicz,
SIEMIENICHIN D. Je.,
SIENIUSZKIN N. M.,
SILCZENKOW Iwan M.,
SINIEGUBOW Nikolaj I.,
SJURIN A. B.,
SKORODUMOW W. Je.,
SMYKALOW I. P.,
SOLOWJOW M. M.,
SOLOWJOW W. A.,
SOROKIN W. K.,
STIEKOLSZCZYKOW I. A.,
STIELMACH Iwan Iwanowicz,
STIEPANOW Iwan Aleksiejewicz,
SUCHARJEW Nikolaj I.,
SYROMIATNIKOW Mitrofan Wasyljewicz,
SYTIN W. M.,
SZCZEPKO T. S.,
SZEWJELEW A. M.,
SZYGALEW Iwan Iwanowicz,
SZYGALEW Wasylij I.,
TARASOW G. N.,
TICHONOW D. F.,
TICHONOW P. P.,
TIKUNOW I. Je.,
TIMOSZENKO G. I.,
TIWONIENKO L. A.,
TOCZENOW A. M.,
TROJAN Konstantin Grygorjewicz,
WIGOWSKI Je. A.,
ZACHAROW A. Je.,
ZAJCEW Aleksandr Grygorjewicz,
ZILBERMAN Konstantin Sergiejewicz,
ZINOWJEW N. P.,
ZIUSKIN G. P. ,
ZORIN P. M.,
ZUBCOW W. P.,
ZUBOW N. A.,
ZURAWLOW M. M.,
ZURAWLOW N. T.,
ZYLCOW W. I.,
ZYLA M. A.

(1)
“The responsible persons for executions came from Moscow to lead the operation, and among them were: Senior Major of State Security Nikolai Siniegubow - former head of the Central Board of Railway Service - then Blokhin, the commander of NKVD of the USSR and kombrig Krywienko - Commander of the Main Convoy Forces. [...] The said Blokhin, Siniegublow and Krywienko lived in the wagon-salon, which stood at the Kalinin station, on a dead track. [...] A total of about 30 people participated in the shootings. [...] Blokhin took part. [...] Shooting was also carried out by the drivers and convoy guards. [...] The procedure was developed by Blokhin and the commander Rubanow of our NKVD Board. They soundproof the outgoing door into the corridor, so the shots could not be heard in the cells. Then the prisoner was dragged through corridor to the "red room". In the “red room”, his identity was checked, whether it agrees with the prepared execution list. [...] He was handcuffed and introduced into the cell, where he was shot in the neck. The cell walls were also covered with the soundproof material. [...] Blokhin put his special clothes: brown leather hat, a long brown leather coat, brown leather gloves with cuffs above the elbows. It had made a huge impression on me - I saw the executioner! [...] The first transport brought in over 300 people. It turned out to be too much. The night was short and we had to end at dawn. Then we began to bring 250 per transport [...] Walther pistols, they brought an entire suitcase. [...] It turned out, the pistols were wearing out quickly. [...] Well, the execution cell had a door into the yard. [...] That way the bodies were pulled, loaded on the truck and drove away. [...] Everything was covered with canvas. [...] When I raised the issue of workers needed to dig graves, they laughed at me. Naive man. The excavator was needed! [...] Blokhin brought with him two excavator operators. [...] Everyone, after every night of shooting, were buried in the same pit. [...] It took a month. [...] And when we finished this whole dirty matter, Muscovites arranged in their wagon-salon the banquet. [...] The event was obviously horrible, since later Rubanow lost his mind, Pavlov, my deputy, shot himself, Blokhin - shot himself as well. Here's what it all means.”

Polish documentary film about executions in Kalinin


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